PRESS INTOLERANCE

So the Times – EU threat to thwart holidays and the Express – Spain vows to defy EU plot to ruin our hols are 2 examples of the press taking an unnecessary ani EU stance. It is not a plot or a threat, but a response to a surge in Ovid cases in the UK, especially in countries which have not had such a good record of vaccine roll out. It seems that they like feeding candy to the bigoted!

And then bosso Rishi Sumak says he will stop wearing a mask as soon as possible. Why could he not say that he was looking forward to reduced restrictions on mask wearing? Ask bus drivers and rail transport staff if they are happy to see more and more people not wearing a mask? Mixed messages again Fromm the cabinet.

Hancock could not keep his zip done up, I suppose that the sleaze element needed addressing as most other failures of government have been exhaustively pursued.

Roaming costs are being introduced for travellers to the EU by EE, others will follow.

Osborne, who initiated austerity cuts to cultural activities has been appointed Chair of the British Museum. At least it is unpaid (although I suspect the expenses claim would make my eyes water).

Will banning advertising of junk food make a difference? Nice headlines but no real impact. And why the 9pm watershed – it is the people preparing or buying the meals that need to be educated, not just the children. How about a compulsory labelling scheme. To be backed up by a web site where products could be searched for details of ingredients and health aspects. And also commission people like Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson, Mary Berry, Gordon Ramsey, Sunny Anderson, etc. to write a book of suitable recipes for children, and for families – and the government then provide free copies (multiple – 1:30 students) for schools and libraries, and colleges and universities.

And then I would suspect/guess/hope that the cost of fresh food versus processed/takeaway could be altered. And shut up about jobs – we can laugh about lift attendants to push buttons in a job creation scheme in theSoviet Union; But is encouraging people to buy takeaways with the health costs involved, not as bad, if not worse than encouraging people to cook their own.

And this seems like a no brainer. Farm stalls are often expensive – the produce good, but pricey. This must be down to the staff expenses. Farm shops should be able to reduce these costs but seem not to. How about abolishing rents in food markets if the produce is fresh and not wrapped in plastic – applications for stalls should set out their worthiness. All this is a bit of nonsense, but needs thinking about.

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